The year in photography

By: and - December 30, 2022 6:00 am
A pensive Rev. James Lawson at Vanderbilt University in May. (Photo: John Partipilo)

A pensive Rev. James Lawson at Vanderbilt University in May. (Photo: John Partipilo)

Campaigns and Elections 

The midterm election year brought new congressional and legislative districts after a once-a-decade redistricting process that, for the first time, carved Davidson County into three congressional districts. Gov. Bill Lee easily won reelection to a second term and Tennessee Republicans coasted to wins in congressional and legislative races.

Andrew Towle prayed for strength to be given to Gov. Bill Lee on Nov. 7, 2022. (Photo: John Partipilo)
Andrew Towle prayed for strength to be given to Gov. Bill Lee on Nov. 7, 2022. Lee won reelection by an almost 40% margin of victory.(Photo: John Partipilo)

Civil Rights Leaders

The Civil Rights Movement has a long history in Tennessee, from Nashville’s lunch counter sit-ins of the early 1960s to the 1968 garbage strikes in Memphis that culminated with the assassination of Rev. Martin Luther King. Two leaders of the early Movement returned to Nashville in 2022, revisiting sites central to their activism. Rev. James Lawson, who studied the principles of nonviolent protest under Mahatma Gandhi in India before in turn teaching them to students at Fisk University, Tennessee State University and American Baptist College, came to Vanderbilt University for the launch of an institute established in his name. Lawson was expelled from Vanderbilt Divinity School in 1960 for his activist.

One of Lawson’s protege’s, Rev. Bernard LaFayette was a student at American Baptist College and roommate to the late U.S. Rep. John Lewis. Lafayette, who led the Selma, Alabama voter registration campaign and later served as president of American Baptist College, spent a November weekend in Nashville to revisit the college and preach at his former church.

Rev. Dr. Bernard Lafayette and his wife, Kate Bulls Lafayette, leave American Baptist College in Nashville on Friday after a visit to see renovations. (Photo: John Partipilo)
Rev. Dr. Bernard Lafayette and his wife, Kate Bulls Lafayette, leave American Baptist College in Nashville on Friday after a visit to see renovations. (Photo: John Partipilo)

National politics come to Tennessee

National political figures rolled through the Volunteer State, with perhaps the largest congregation at the June Faith and Freedom “Road to Majority” event at Nashville’s Opryland Hotel: Former President Donald Trump headlined the event, which also featured Florida GOP Sen. Rick Scott, U.S. Rep. Jim Jordan of Ohio, and both of Tennessee’s U.S. Senators, Marsha Blackburn and Bill Hagerty. Meanwhile, Democrats including Vice-President Kamala Harris, First Lady Jill Biden and Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigeig made stops, with Buttigeig addressing infrastructure in Memphis.

5th Congressional District Republican nominee Andy Ogles joined Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, in Franklin Wednesday, October 26, as part of Cruz's "Truth and Courage PAC" tour. (Photo: Tennessee Lookout staff)
5th Congressional District Republican nominee Andy Ogles joined Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, in Franklin on October 26, as part of Cruz’s “Truth and Courage PAC” tour. (Photo: Holly McCall)

Former President Donald Trump, photographed by John Partipilo on June 17 at the Gaylord Opryland Hotel.
Former President Donald Trump, photographed by John Partipilo on June 17 at the Gaylord Opryland Hotel.

Legal woes

Political corruption caught up with several Tennessee lawmakers, as former Speaker of the House Glen Casada, Rep. Robin Smith Sen. Brian Kelsey—all Republicans—were indicted for charges including conspiracy to commit mail fraud, conspiracy to defraud the federal government, wire fraud and kickbacks, while Democratic Sen. Katrina Robinson was expelled from the Senate for violating the chamber’s ethics policy for two felony convictions.

Lawyers for Hunter Hollingsworth argue the placement of surveillance equipment on Hollingworth's land by the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency is in violation of Tennessee's Constitution. (Photo: John Partipilo)
Lawyers for Hunter Hollingsworth argue the placement of surveillance equipment on Hollingworth’s land by the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency is in violation of Tennessee’s Constitution. Hollingsworth won his case; the TWRA lost. (Photo: John Partipilo)

 

 

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John Partipilo
John Partipilo

Working as a photojournalist for 40 years, Partipilo has won awards such as NPPA Best of Photojournalism and nominated for two Pulitzers. His photography has also been featured in national and international publications. Most importantly Partipilo’s work is about people — people in their different environments and people in their different stages of life. That’s the heart of his work. To him people are so important, because they all have a unique story.

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Holly McCall
Holly McCall

Holly McCall has been a fixture in Tennessee media and politics for decades. She covered city hall for papers in Columbus, Ohio and Joplin, Missouri before returning to Tennessee with the Nashville Business Journal. She has served as political analyst for WZTV Fox 17 and provided communications consulting for political campaigns at all levels, from city council to presidential. Holly brings a deep wealth of knowledge about Tennessee’s political processes and players and likes nothing better than getting into the weeds of how political deals are made.

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